The Most Memorable

Regardless of what your stance is on American politics, you can’t deny the historical weight the last couple of weeks have held. Between the election, the super-est of super moons on November 14th (apparently the largest since 1948; we won’t see another one this big until 2034), and the release of A Tribe Called Quest’s first album in 18 years, I’d say this November will go down as one of the most memorable on record.

It’s a memorable month so far at the Carpenters Building, too. We held our first-ever dance party (a smashing success, I’d say), applied for our building permits through the city, and have a preview of a compelling installation by Christopher Jordan on Black Friday.

We’re also on the hunt for volunteer staff to help out with events and promotions as well as a web designer (not volunteer)over the next few months. Interested in working with us? Like music, art, events, or just want to be more involved? Shoot us an email!

Finally, we can’t let this most memorable of months slip by without saying how thankful we are for you. Your support and enthusiasm for our crazy project has been nothing short of inspiring.

Artist Trust will be hosting Office Hours at our space on Saturday from 12-2pm. All artists welcome to this free event where they will learn how to apply for funding from Artist Trust.

Artist Trust will be hosting Office Hours at our space on Saturday from 12-2pm. All artists welcome to this free event where they will learn how to apply for funding from Artist Trust.


Where we’re going

This Thursday, the 17th, Tacoma’s Culture Shock Collective will take over the 1120 Creative House with High Blood, a group exhibition that features artists of color exploring “issues that give them high blood in the context of their own lived experiences.” The opening event is from 6-10pm. On Saturday, Artist Trust will be holding Office Hours at the Carpenters Building, a free grant writing support program, where they will give artists of all disciplines advice on how to apply for funding from Artist Trust. Stop by from 12-2pm. That same night, DJ Press Play will be spinning trap, hip hop, r&b, and Cambodian music with Justin Tamminga on drums at the Mule Tavern from 9pm-2am. On Monday, the 21st, relax and recover from your weekend with Christina Felty for a Gratitude Sound Bath at Good Karma Center for Joy at 7:30pm. From November 20th through December 3rd, Feast Arts Center will project messages of support and love from the community on the side of their building from 6-9pm. You can participate by sending them your images. Finally, don’t miss the preview show of Colored, where you can witness the installation of Receipts: stop erasing black people, a collaboration between Christopher Paul Jordan and Jaleesa Trapp.

What we're reading

"You can't touch music - it exists only at the moment it is being apprehended - and yet it can profoundly alter how we view the world and our place in it. Music can get us through difficult patches in our lives by changing not only how we feel about ourselves, but also how we feel about everything outside ourselves." Written in 2013, David Byrne explores the patterns and technology shaping and being shaped by music. It's an easy and engaging read, and the cover feels and looks good. Although a bit lengthy, it's a good book to get you through the impending holidays. 

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Christopher Paul Jordan in his studio.

Christopher Paul Jordan in his studio.

Who we’re watching
Christopher Paul Jordan learned to draw years after learning to compose through digital design. As a result, his process is centered around collage: layering, reframing and recontextualizing imagery to construct narratives from new vantages. Broadly spoken, his aim is to bridge audiences and to interrogate the histories at work where disparate standpoints and their accompanying values endure unredeemed. Recently, Chris was the recipient of the Greater Tacoma Community Foundation's Foundation of Art award, and is in the process of curating an exhibit of all black artists to be shown during the week of Kwanzaa at the Carpenters Building.